Tag Archives: High Fidelity

High Fidelity now in Open Beta


High Fidelity is an open source virtual world platform

On 27th April 2016 the High Fidelity Twitter account announced that High Fidelity is now in Open Beta. High Fidelity was first founded in April 2013 by Philip Rosedale when he started the company from scratch. High Fidelity is a software platform that allows you to create shared, editable, virtual reality spaces on your own home computer or cloud server.

Three years later High Fidelity has grown a lot and its great news to hear that High Fidelity has now reached the open beta phrase. It’s free at no cost. Spread the word! 🙂

We’re delighted to announce High Fidelity’s open beta! Check it out here: https://t.co/WnRMvqy3Idpic.twitter.com/ib4jClgro1

— High Fidelity (@highfidelityinc) 27 April 2016

Also…

New this week

Philip Rosedale was at SVVR 2016 this week talking about High Fidelity and showed off a brief demonstration of the social VR platform. Philip Rosedale made the announcement that they’ve been building towards open beta for the past three years.

Shared VR is going to be a much bigger phenomena than even what we’ve experienced so far.” – Philip Rosedale

Try the Open Beta today

If you are interested in trying out High Fidelity Open Beta > download here. You can stay updated on the latest news via the High Fidelity Blog.  There are many interesting videos and new demos to watch on High Fidelity, see here.

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The Drax Files Radio Hour Show #75 with Philip Rosedale


Check out the new special Drax Files podcast @75 featuring Philip Rosedale talking about High Fidelity and a little on Second Life. This show was broadcasted from within High Fidelity for the first time and the show runs for 1hr/29 minutes.

Skip to 54 minutes to listen to the special interview between Draxtor and Philip Rosedale talking High Fidelity. I found the interview pretty much interesting and fascinating.

Give it a listen if you are interested in learning more on High Fidelity.

Signing up to High Fidelity Open Alpha


Today I decided to sign up to High Fidelity Open  Alpha for the first time and as many know already I love testing/trying out early new developments out. Firstly its worth going to the Sign up page to create a account and get started. Then you should receive a email soon after to verify your email. Then you should get another email saying “Alpha: You’re in! What’s next?” with a simple checklist.

The simple checklist gives you many options to get started including watching tutorial videos, downloading the interface, setting up your own domain using the Stack Manager, registering place names and for discussions visit the Alpha Forums.

Downloading the interface takes up around 40MB and each build may change in size. Once installed, log in and start your High Fidelity Open Alpha experience. Again this is a very early alpha and it’s not finished yet.

At this stage it’s worth watching High Fidelity video tutorials and reading the High Fidelity documentation to learn more. 🙂

High Fidelity Open Alpha

My first ever look at High Fidelity Open Alpha

High Fidelity Open Alpha

The interface on High Fidelity Open Alpha

I hope that this helps when you sign up to High Fidelity Open Alpha. I will blog more on HF and share more snapshots soon.

High Fidelity Open Alpha Phase starts


Philip Rosedale announced on Wednesday 1st April that High Fidelity has moved into the early open alpha phase. Please note that this is a very early release with loads of bugs in it and that many things need to be improved. If you love testing early developments then this is something for you to try out.

In recent weeks invites have been sent out to start testing High Fidelity and I’m glad it’s moved into the open alpha phase. I have signed up today to High Fidelity and I will publish what I think soon.

High Fidelity’s open source software is now available for early alpha use, enabling you to download client and server installers, deploy your own domain servers, create user accounts, register unique placenames, and start building and experimenting.

This is a very early release, and High Fidelity is still very much a work in progress. The look and visual quality is far from complete, and big things like avatar movement animation and physics are still not in place. There are lots of bugs to fix, and content formats will continue to change. But enough systems are now functional to make us feel that High Fidelity is useful for some types of work, experimentation, and exploration. Having run a small and controlled early alpha to iron out the really show-stopping bugs, we’re now eager to engage a larger group and recruit open source contributions from other developers working on building the metaverse.

You can download the client and server installers, create domain servers, create user accounts and start building in this early open alpha phase. There is a alpha version of the High Fidelity marketplace where you can find scripts, building materials, avatars and much more. There is work being done to add payment systems in the near future.

You can create your own virtual world by downloading and running the Stack Manager.  The client software that you use to enter your world or those others have created is available by running Interface, and runs on Windows, Mac, and Linux.  We are working on a GearVR/Android version as well, but it isn’t ready yet.

You can build content by importing models and using JavaScript to create interactive objects and behaviors.  You can communicate with your voice and with facial expressions, and you can optionally use the Oculus Rift HMD and other input devices like the Razer Hydra to touch and edit the world.   We will also support the HTC Vive HMD and hand controllers as soon as they are available.

3D Audio is operational:  If you are using a high-quality headset, you can hear other people and objects in the environment at their correct locations, with very low latency, and with the echoes of your own voice off the virtual walls.  Sounds can also be made by interactive objects in-world, and audio is mixed together by a server node so that many people can talk together without increasing the audio bit-rate each person receives.

Avatars can be created with a variety of characteristics, whose faces are animated in real time using both head motion and audio (for HMD users) or more highly detailed expressions gathered from a depth-camera  (for desktop users), as you can see in this video from our recent funding announcement:

The transition from the alpha phase to the beta phase will happen within the year or so bringing greater stability along with much more. For now it’s a work in progress and its far from complete.

You can expect continuous and substantial changes as we complete new features; we will likely break content as we continue to design and experiment.   The transition from ‘alpha’ to ‘beta’, which we expect will happen over a year or so, will signal greater stability in the content formats.  But as an open source project with contributions from many developers and with a broad set of features working, we think the time is right to open things up completely for early use.

For the latest news on High Fidelity visit the blog to stay updated.