Category Archives: Second Life Stats

Tyche Shepherd publishes March 2016 Private Estate Survey


On 26th March Tyche Shepherd published the March 2016 Private Estate Survey on the SLUniverse Forums showing newly updated results based on a sample of 5, 000 randomly selected private estate regions.

Tyche Shepherd does an excellent job every week publishing new weekly SL sims posts and it’s still one of the best sources for the latest Second Life statistics. Tyche first posted weekly stats back in early March 2008.

The key points for this survey are – see bottom of this blog post for full results

  • Full Regions : 2266
  • Homestead Regions: 1921
  • Openspace: 21
  • Closed to Public :792
  • Tier is still healthy at just under US$3.4M for the month
  • Of the 4208 accessible regions, 53.9% are Full Regions, 45.6% are Homesteads and 0.5% are Openspaces.
  • Private estates had a net loss of 1875 Regions to a total of 17549 representing an overall decline of 10.7% since Nov 2013. The proportion closed to public access was significantly up from 12.0% to 15.8%.
  • The top 20 landowners currently control 49.1% (+/- 1.3%) of private estate regions, This is significantly up on Nov 2013 (39.5%) , using list prices their holdings account for 40.6% of total private estate tier (Nov 2013 was 30.5%)
  • The top 10 landowners are 36.4% (+/- 1.2%) of regions and 29.5% of tier 
  • The Top 10 Full Region/Homestead/Openspace proportions are 37.1%/62.8%/0.1% and 38.6%/61.3%/0.0% for the top 20
  • Total known ACS holdings come to 19.1%. (13.8% in Nov 2013)
  • Taking these figures a good estimate of private estate tier due each month is US$3,385,000 +/- US$43,000 .

The Top 20 Estates by number of regions held are as follows:

  • Dreamseeker Estates 6.1%
  • Azure Islands (ACS) 5.1%
  • Richmond Land Management 4.9%
  • Zoha Islands 4.7%
  • Jessica Chung (ACS) 3.3%
  • Weezles Real Estate (WRE) 2.8%
  • Surreal Chung (ACS) 2.6%
  • Victoria Chung (ACS) 2.6%
  • Miriam Chung (ACS) 2.3%
  • Lorena Chung (ACS) 2.0%
  • Blanxi Estates 2.0%
  • Lala Rentals 1.5%
  • Jewels Island 1.4%
  • Fruit Islands Estate 1.4%
  • Bell Estates 1.2%
  • Lombardi Holdings 1.2%
  • Heidi Chung (ACS) 1.0%
  • Kendallwood Virtual Estates 1.0% tied for 18th place with …
  • Serena Estates 1.0%
  • Luxory Estates 1.0%

The regions were running on the following distribution of server class

  • Unknown 0.05%
  • Class 701 46.15%
  • Class 801 53.78%
  • Class 830 0.02%

March 2016 Private Estate Survey Resuls In Full

Well it’s been a while since my last Private Estate Survey run back in November 2013 which you can find in this same thread here New SL Sims in past week

So here is the March 2016 Private Estate Survey , these results are based on a sample of 5000 randomly selected private estate regions designed to estimate Full/Homestead/Openspace penetration.

Summary: Overall distribution of Region types is very much unchanged from Nov 2013. Ownership however is much more concentrated with a larger proportion of the grid being owned by the top estates. Tier is still healthy at just under US$3.4M for the month

The key results are as follows:

  • Full Regions : 2266
  • Homestead Regions: 1921
  • Openspace: 21
  • Closed to Public :792

Of the 4208 accessible regions , 53.9% are Full Regions, 45.6% are Homesteads and 0.5% are Openspaces. The Margins of Error are +/-1.28% , +/- 1.28% and +/-0.18% respectively for the three figures figure at the 95% confidence level. Full Regions and Homesteads have gained 0.1% each in share since July with Openspaces losing 0.2% . So in 2 and a bit years very little change in distribution of region types.

During this period Private estates had a net loss of 1875 Regions to a total of 17549 representing an overall decline of 10.7% since Nov 2013 . The proportion closed to public access was significantly up from 12.0% to 15.8%.

2 of the Full Regions were Linden Developed Regions (i.e. sold new with content) were included in the sample this time, but no Developed Homestead was sampled. Again as with all previous surveys this is too small penetration to estimate total number. 32 of the sampled full regions were Skill Gaming designated ones (1.7% of Private Estate Regions).

284 of the 1921 (14.68%) Homestead regions were at the new non-grandfathered rate, this is down on Nov 2013 figure of 17.6% .

Taking these figures a good estimate of private estate tier due each month is US$3,385,000 +/- US$43,000 . (Calculated using known grandfathering rates but excludes any academic reductions and is rounded to the closest US$1000), this figure is significantly down on Nov 2013’s estimate of US$3,857,000 by $472,000 (down by 12%).

The top 20 landowners currently control 49.1% (+/- 1.3%) of private estate regions, This is significantly up on Nov 2013 (39.5%) , using list prices their holdings account for 40.6% of total private estate tier (Nov 2013 was 30.5%)

The figures for the top 10 landowners are 36.4% (+/- 1.2%) of regions and 29.5% of tier (the larger estates tend to have a bigger proportion of homesteads than smaller estates). This share for the top 10 is significantly up on Nov 2013’s figure of 28.9% of private estate regions.

Useful Links

Second Life & OpenSim Statistics – March 2016


Data from the Second Life Grid Survey

My last statistics blog post on Second Life was published on 4th January 2016 where I reported that Second Life regions shrunk during the course of 2015 and I mentioned that this year will be a challenging year. Since January 2016 the grid has lost more regions in Second Life and the trend seems to be continuing with a few hundred regions going offline every 2-3 months.

Some good news is that Linden Owned regions have increased slightly already during the first three months of 2016. Tyche Shepherd mentions in the latest weekly grid report that “the Lab brought online 19 Development regions way of to the North West of the grid all closed to the public – The region names indicate they are part of something called the HE Project“.

On 3rd January 2016

  • Total number of Main Grid regions: 24, 886
  • Private Estates: 17, 775 
  • Linden Owned: 7, 111

As of 6th March 2016

  • Total number of Main Grid regions: 24, 693
  • Private Estates: 17, 568 > YTD Private Estate Net Loss: 207 regions (1.2% down) 
  • Linden Owned: 7, 125

The highest amount of Main Grid regions was recorded on 13th June 2010 with 31,988 regions in Second Life. Today there are 24, 693 Main Grid regions and if you are interested then you follow the weekly grid numbers here 

OpenSim

Last month it was reported by Hypergrid Business that OpenSim traffic was up, land area drops which is surprising news to hear after a surge over recent years.

As of February 2016

  • “The total land area of the public OpenSim grids fell by 16,771 region equivalents”
  • “OpenSim now has 54,786 standard region equivalents and a record high of 513,398 registered users.”
  • OSGrid, Kitely, Metropolis and Lost Paradise have the most regions on OpenSim.
  • InWorldz, OSGrid, Metropolis and the Great Canadian Grid have the most active users.

Data from Hypergrid Business

My next stats post will be published in early June 2016 – (every 3 months hopefully).

New article posted on Second Life & Project Sansar via readwrite.com


On 2nd March 2016 there was a new article posted on Second Life and Project Sansar via readwrite.com which is worth reading.  Ryan Matthew Pierson spoke to Ebbe Altberg CEO of Linden Lab, Peter Gray the director of global communications for the lab and Gary Wisniewski who is the founder of Treet.TV.

Second Life

The article begins with Second Life mentioning things you can can participate inworld such as visiting nightclubs, art exhibits, shopping mails and more. There is mention that there is a surge of virtual reality headsets coming to the market which is true but it’s still very early days for the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive.

The article goes on to the magic behind Second Life rise in popularity where it goes into detail about the media attention Second Life had between 2006 and 2007. I would say today there is still media attention on Second Life but probably not as much as there used to be.

Much of this media attention hyped the breakthrough technology behind bringing a living, thriving virtual world to life where residents could build virtual objects using basic shapes – referred to as primitives or “prims” by its residents – from within the world itself”. 

“You could travel quickly from island to island, experiencing a fantasy world filled with a lush forest one minute and a sprawling post-apocalyptic CyberPunk-style city the next. Just about everywhere you went, there were crowds of people taking in the sights, chatting about their experiences, or dancing the night away in one of Second Life’s many nightclubs”.

I remember joining when the population of Second Life was about the hit the 1 million mark and this was a major milestone for Second Life back in the early days. It’s a balancing act between first life and Second Life I would say.

“Second Life’s active population grew to over 1,000,000 residents. These residents came from all walks of life, and from across the globe. A culture began to form within the virtual world, leading to the popular in-world joke: “I’ve canceled my subscription to first life.”

In the article Ryan mentions some of the advantages for using Second Life from owning land, starting a business, building a house to starting up new communities .

“There was indeed something about Second Life that appealed to those that called it their virtual home. You could own land, start businesses, build your own house, and establish virtual neighborhoods and communities.

“This appeal extended well beyond tech-savvy early adopters. Many residents found that you could do things in Second Life that transcended physical disadvantages. For example, someone bound to a wheelchair could dance the night away in Second Life’s nightclubs, or even fly through a mountain range like a superhero.”

Yay, there is mention for the annual Relay For Life events that raise so much money for charity.

Second Life is host to annual “Relay for Life” events, offering residents the opportunity to walk or even race snails to raise money for charity.

Early hype for Second Life

Now we come to the Bumps in the road section of the article talking about expectations and the early hype for Second Life which is rather interesting. I love reading things about the early days of Second Life.

“But despite the early hype, Second Life wasn’t necessarily ready for prime time just yet. Lag was a considerable issue for residents, and the desktop client used to connect to the virtual world was complex and difficult to master.”

Gary Wisniewski says in the article that “The main reason Second Life failed to achieve expectations is because, for the majority of new users who signed up during the growth period, the benefits of using Second Life did not exceed the effort required to gain those benefits.” 

“It’s like going to Omaha Nebraska and standing on a street corner where you don’t know anybody,”

“The tendency is to take a taxi back to the airport. But, I bet if you spend a few weeks there, you’d discover some interesting things.”

Mid way through there is mention on early Second Life mentioning that children couldn’t create Second Life accounts and that ratings were used to separate the different types of content for given areas. Some had to submit payment information to verify that they are adults and agreed to access adult content.

“Early Second Life was also just starting to figure out the rules of the virtual world. There was a point when children couldn’t create Second Life accounts — as much of the virtual world was a virtual red light district. It gave Second Life a bit of a reputation for being a seedy and uninviting place for youth and businesses.”

“Linden Lab stepped in and put together some tools to help make Second Life a more friendly environment. Ratings were used to designate the type of language and content that would be accepted in given areas, with some areas designated “PG,” while others would be restricted to residents that have submitted payment information to verify that they are adults, and agreed to see adult content in-world.”

Finally there is mention that Linden Lab has improved the client and server infrastructure of Second Life to improve performance and the ease of use over the past decade. There have been so many great improvements made to Second Life over the years and I’m sure there is more great improvements going to be made during 2016.

“Over the past decade, Linden Lab has continued to improve both its client and its server infrastructure in an effort to greatly improve both performance and ease-of-use without sacrificing residents’ familiar environment and feature set.”

In mid June 2016 Second Life will be celebrating its 13th birthday. Wooot!:)

Project Sansar

As many know already Project Sansar is the next generation platform and it will be built from the ground up supporting VR headsets. It will be taking the advantage of the latest technology for years to come. Second Life has supported the Oculus Rift since 2014 and if you want to experience the VR you will need to have a consistent 90 frames per second to enjoy it.

“You need a consistent 90 frames-per-second in order to really experience the immersive qualities VR can provide, a difficult feat given the heavy burden of the Second Life platform on clients.” 

Ebbe Altberg says that “There is the immersion of being inside the world versus looking at the world that makes a massive difference”. “He went on to describe the feeling of true immersion that comes with not only seeing the virtual world from a 3D perspective but in having your head and arm movements relay directly to that experience.”

Linden Lab wants to make Project Sansar more cross-platform including mobile devices and HMDs. Yay!:)

“Linden Lab also wants to make Project Sansar more cross-platform accessible. Where Second Life is largely tied to a desktop-only experience, Project Sansar’s users will be able to log in and enjoy the virtual world from various other platforms including mobile devices as well as HMDs.”

Peter Gray says that “Our goal is to make creators successful. The creator is our target audience, and we want them to be successful and to be able to attract an audience into their creations.”

Project Sansar Cheaper Land Prices

The lab plans to lower the price of inworld land rental fees to make it more appealing to creators using Project Sansar. For a small island it’s around the $300 a month in Second Life.

“One of the ways Linden Lab plans to make Project Sansar more appealing to creators is by lowering the price of in-world land rental fees. Currently in Second Life, a full simulator – a small island in the virtual world – runs up to nearly $300 a month. With Project Sansar, they hope to bring costs down and pass those savings on to the creator.”

And there’s more…

At the end of the article there is mention on the opening of Project Sansar due around of the end of 2016/early 2017, Second Life is still a profitable part of Linden Lab business with over 900, 000 active residents with over $60 million in real world money in the past year.

There are no plans for Project Sansar to replace Second Life. Ebbe Altberg points out that both worlds will co-exist side by side for many years to come.

Peter Gray says that “Our plan is to open the doors for the world to come in and do what they want around the end of 2016.”

“But current Second Life residents need not worry; the existing Second Life is currently a profitable part of Linden Lab’s business, with over 900,000 active residents redeeming just over $60 million in real-world money from the virtual world in the past year. There are no plans for Project Sansar to replace Second Life; instead, both worlds will co-exist. “I envision Second Life and Sansar going side-by-side for many, many years,” says Altberg.”

What do you think about this latest article on Second Life and Project Sansar ? Share your views in comments below. Thanks!:)